Big Farm & Little Farm Are Closer Than I Thought

Over the last decade, the media and our society have planted a seed in my head that anything ‘big’ must be corrupt, evil and/or horribly unhealthy – whether it be ‘Big Box’, ‘Big Agra’, ‘Big Brother’, ‘Big Bird’… no wait, I’m pretty sure that last one hasn’t been convicted yet.

Burnbrae Farms 1

As it turns out, ‘Big Egg’ sure has a ‘Little Egg’ feel here in Canada. Last week I had the opportunity to have a day on the farm and visited one of Canada’s largest egg producers, Burnbrae Farms.

Burnbrae Farms 2

During my day at the farm, not only did I become a plethora of egg knowledge (test me, I double dog dare you), but I also had the opportunity to check out all of the hens that are housed at the farm in Lyn, Ontario. The hens at this location are kept in one of three kinds of housing, Conventional, Enriched and Aviary (Free Run). There is lots of information on the advantages and disadvantages of each form of housing on Burnbrae’s website… but at the end of the day, I think if I were a chicken, I’d be pretty darn content to be in the conventional housing, and feel pretty spiffy to live in the enriched (meaning, since spending a day on the farm and doing a lot of independent research on the subject, I will now be buying regular ol’ eggs with a good conscience).

Burnbrae Farms 4

What stuck with me the most about my visit to Burnbrae Farms is that although this is a huge operation that supplies our entire country with eggs in one form or another and even has industrial customers south of the border, it is still a family farm. The Hudson Family have been farming on the land in Lyn for over 120 years, and producing eggs for half of that. The original homestead still stands on the property and the company is still privately owned and operated by the Hudsons.

Burnbrae Farms 6

Myself and the other 12 bloggers on the #BBFFarmTour were not just guests of Burnbrae Farms, we were the personal guests of the Hudson family. We were invited into their homes and their lives and were treated like old friends as soon as we met. Success has definitely not gone to their heads as they were all so down to earth and totally into their business; the Hudsons really care about being on top of their game when it comes to being as socially responsible as they can, whether it be the development of innovative packaging to the humane treatment of the thousands of animals they house. During the day I was taken back to my childhood many times and to the memories of days of visiting the farms near my home in the Annapolis Valley.

Burnbrae Farms 5

The word big is a whole lot kinder, gentler and smaller to me again.

Disclosure: I am participating in the Burnbrae Farms Blogger Farm Tour program as a guest of Burnbrae Farms. All opinions are 100% my own.

#BBFFarmTour

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BurnbraeFarms

Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/burnbraefarms

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/BurnbraeFarms

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About Heather Nolan

Heather Nolan lives just outside of Halifax, Nova Scotia. She loves her lil' family, her cats, traveling, and creating in the kitchen. Her iPhone is often confused for a conjoined twin.

Comments

  1. Good to hear that they truly do supply eggs in a way that I can feel really ok with purchasing and consuming them. After watching Vegucated, I’ve really taken the time to do some soul searching on how our food is so mass and cruelly produced at times. It’s nice to know that there are still large farm operations that care about treating their stock with dignity and thus our food supply. I will definitely continue to purchase Burnbrae products.

  2. I am very relieved to read this Heather…I too worry about where our food comes from. This makes me feel very good about continuing to buy conventional eggs. I love knowing that they are coming from a family farm!

  3. Great pics of the farm, Heather! I’m so glad you got to experience this wonderful family and their business firsthand!

  4. I love food from “family farms”…. and eggs are a staple around here. Thanks for the great post!

  5. So neat. Love to hear about farms doing things the right way. Sounds like a great place to live if you were a chicken. Thanks for the sneak peek into their world.

    PS: One quick question. What comes first? The chicken or the egg?

  6. Great article Heather! How did you stop from making egg jokes!!!

    I LOVE when organizations see the benefit of using bloggers to help educate about their product!!!

  7. beautiful pictures of the day spent on the farm!

  8. I didn’t realize they were family owned! It looks like a beautiful spot.

  9. I am so happy to hear you speak of the humane way the hens are treated. It certainly eases my conscience. Sounds like it was a fabulous trip and the Hudson family sound like wonderful people.

  10. Great post Heather! I agree….we are so lucky to have an amazing egg industry in Canada that puts so much care into their production! I did not see one single unhappy hen anywhere either! Angie xo

  11. Great post Heather! Great farm pictures.We love eggs.

  12. I loved meeting you there Heather. What a great family business. I loved learning about the different kinds of housing.

  13. Thanks! I always feel conflicted about buying from large companies. But you’ve seen ot first hand and those chickies are treated ok! It must have been a cool trip. I love farms!

  14. So fun that you had the opportunity to do this!

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